Found the TIRE INFLATION CHART GoodYear Endurance - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 10-26-2019, 11:25 PM   #1
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Found the TIRE INFLATION CHART GoodYear Endurance

I upgraded my tires last year to Good Year Endurance 205 75 R15. I never could find the tire inflation chart. Shame on me!


I finally found it. I did weight the trailer at a CAT scale and the trailer loaded was only 5000 lbs with 750 lbs on the hitch.


According to the chart using simple 4 tires divided into 5000, I get 1250 lbs per tire. May be a bit off I'm sure, but close enough for gubment work




The chart says I should inflate the tires to 26+psi. WHAT???
I can tell you I have been riding around with pressure a might higher than that


HMMMM??? And Shucks
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Old 10-27-2019, 12:01 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by ArmyVeteran View Post
I upgraded my tires last year to Good Year Endurance 205 75 R15. I never could find the tire inflation chart...

The chart says I should inflate the tires to 26+psi. WHAT???

I can tell you I have been riding around with pressure a might higher than that ...
Here's the chart from the web. I'm pretty sure those are just load LIMITS at various pressures... not necessarily recommended running pressure.

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https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf
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Old 10-27-2019, 12:47 AM   #3
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If I had those tires it says 50 psi? I don't think so.
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Old 10-27-2019, 05:07 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by ATCguy View Post
Here's the chart from the web. I'm pretty sure those are just load LIMITS at various pressures... not necessarily recommended running pressure.

Attachment 5967

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf



That is the same chart I am looking at.



Then I am totally confused. What would the recommended tire pressure be when loaded to 1250 lbs per tire?
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Old 10-27-2019, 05:10 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by azdryheat View Post
If I had those tires it says 50 psi? I don't think so.



Not sure what you mean? The tires are rated for a maximum 60 PSI (non dual) for 2040 lbs of weight.
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Old 10-27-2019, 04:33 PM   #6
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The only tire inflation chart I use for RV tires is reading the max psi cold on the tire then inflating to that.
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Old 10-27-2019, 05:04 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
The only tire inflation chart I use for RV tires is reading the max psi cold on the tire then inflating to that.



Okay, If I do that. That is 65 psi. Which according to the chart is 2150 lbs in a dual tire configuration. Almost twice what I need for my trailer weight. Or 4x times depending on how you look at it.



But that is what I have almost been doing. I have been running 50 psi. Because I could not find the chart.
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Old 10-27-2019, 05:13 PM   #8
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Then I am totally confused. What would the recommended tire pressure be when loaded to 1250 lbs per tire?
That’s just it... these AREN’T recommended pressures, they are LIMITS.

TIRE LOAD LIMITS (LBS) AT VARIOUS COLD INFLATION PRESSURES (PSI) USED IN NORMAL HIGHWAY SERVICE

That is... do not exceed the weight listed at each pressure setting. At least, that’s how I interpret it.
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Old 10-27-2019, 07:27 PM   #9
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Ok, not to be too obtuse


That chart is " not recommended pressures, they are LIMITS" I will accept that for the moment.



So, what is the recommended tire pressure for my setup?
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Old 10-27-2019, 07:45 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by ArmyVeteran View Post
...So, what is the recommended tire pressure for my setup?
They're not gonna go there (Goodyear, that is) for liability reasons. It's a circle... they say ask your RV manufacturer, and the RV builder says ask your tire manufacturer.

This is from their manual:
NOT ALL RVs ARE BUILT THE SAME

The recommended inflation pressures for your tires are indicated on the certification label of your RV or in your owner’s manual. Because RVs can be loaded with different configurations, the load on each tire may vary. For this reason, refer to your owner’s manual or the load/inflation information that can be found at www.goodyearrvtires.com when adjusting the pressure of each individual tire, or consult your Goodyear® Commercial Tire Dealer.

• Never reduce the recommended tire pressure to have a “softer” ride. This will likely damage the tire and could result in a sudden loss of air and erratic driving

• For every one psi a tire is underinflated, you will lose approximately 20-30 pounds of load-carrying capacity per tire (varies based on tire size and single- or dual-tire application)
https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs..._nov112014.pdf

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/tire...n-loading.aspx
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Old 10-27-2019, 08:25 PM   #11
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I think I will have to revert back to my old hot rod/muscle car days


An overinflated tire will wear more in the middle of the tread. And underinflated tire will wear more on the outside of the tread.


So, assuming I stick with the limits established by the "chart", I will go back to my old "chalk" method. Here is a simplified method in this link. The only thing I would add is taking into account the pressure build up while driving.


https://itstillruns.com/figure-wheelbase-8231185.html


Worked in the 60s
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Old 10-31-2019, 04:07 PM   #12
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G rated

This is why I just bought a new set of G rated tires. E rated at 80psi, according to the chart, gives me around 13,000 for max load. My trailer is at that with 2,000 on the pin. Which is good cause the axles are only 5400 each. I should have paid more attention when I bought it! And the lying salesman said it was 1/2 ton towable......

Anyway, I just blew a fully inflated E rated tire doing 62mph. Now I have G rated.
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Old 10-31-2019, 04:30 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by GGreGG View Post
This is why I just bought a new set of G rated tires. E rated at 80psi, according to the chart, gives me around 13,000 for max load. My trailer is at that with 2,000 on the pin. Which is good cause the axles are only 5400 each. I should have paid more attention when I bought it! And the lying salesman said it was 1/2 ton towable......

Anyway, I just blew a fully inflated E rated tire doing 62mph. Now I have G rated.



A salesman lied?? That almost never happens hahaha
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Old 11-03-2019, 03:57 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by ATCguy View Post
Here's the chart from the web. I'm pretty sure those are just load LIMITS at various pressures... not necessarily recommended running pressure.
Attachment 5967
https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf

There are a couple ways to look at Load/Inflation tables.


1. For a know load the chart tells you the MINIMUM inflation required
2. For a specified inflation the chart tells you the MAXIMUM allowable load.


HERE is a post on when the "Minimum inflation is also the Maximum"


I also have a number of posts that offer suggestions on how to identify a desired cold inflation pressure. The charts are a starting place for those interested in balancing good ride and longer tire life.
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:09 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by ArmyVeteran View Post
I think I will have to revert back to my old hot rod/muscle car days


An overinflated tire will wear more in the middle of the tread. And underinflated tire will wear more on the outside of the tread.


So, assuming I stick with the limits established by the "chart", I will go back to my old "chalk" method. Here is a simplified method in this link. The only thing I would add is taking into account the pressure build up while driving.


https://itstillruns.com/figure-wheelbase-8231185.html


Worked in the 60s

Wondering if you were running Bias or Radials in your old hot rod/muscle car days? Bias tires are much more sensitive to inflation changes and tread wear than radials.


While the "chalk test" is reasonable rough indicator of alignment and can give a rough indication on inflation, it is important to understand that any internal structural damage done from running under-inflated is permanent and can eventually lead to separations as the microscopic cracks can only grow larger as they NEVER get smaller.


As I have covered in my blog, from a tire durability standpoint it is better to start with know tire loads and to add some margin of extra load capacity (increase inflation) and to ALWAYS run a TPMS.
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Old 11-03-2019, 04:43 PM   #16
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I have Goodyear Endurance 215 75x14 on my 2017 Coleman 20' TT. It weighs 5000 lbs fully loaded and full of water. The tires are labeled right on the sidewall in big letters, MAX inflation 65LBS. That is where I keep them. ABSOLUTELY the best trailer tire made.
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Old 11-03-2019, 05:44 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Wondering if you were running Bias or Radials in your old hot rod/muscle car days? Bias tires are much more sensitive to inflation changes and tread wear than radials.


While the "chalk test" is reasonable rough indicator of alignment and can give a rough indication on inflation, it is important to understand that any internal structural damage done from running under-inflated is permanent and can eventually lead to separations as the microscopic cracks can only grow larger as they NEVER get smaller.


As I have covered in my blog, from a tire durability standpoint it is better to start with know tire loads and to add some margin of extra load capacity (increase inflation) and to ALWAYS run a TPMS.



I was the first gear head in my circle of friends to put radial tires on my cars. A 69 Road Runner learned the hard way on twisty, turney Kelly Drive in Philadelphia not to mess with my 69 Cougar. But I digress


I will maintain the minimums as indicated in the chart and go from there. I cannot understand inflating to the "maximum pressure" as indicated on the tire. That is for maximum load. To my way of thinking that is asking for a rougher ride and tire wear in the middle of the tire.


Your mileage may vary.

And I have been using Tire Pressure monitors since before 2000.

Thanks for the info TireMan. Appreciate it.
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Old 11-05-2019, 03:35 PM   #18
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Run more inflation than the load requires??

There is a good reason to increase inflation above the minimum needed to support the measured load and that is to try and lower the Interply Shear forces.

If you want to know why this is suggested then you may need to understand a little about the Science behind tire failures by learning about this force that is always trying to give you a belt separation.


Here is what Goodyear says in March 2019

Here is what I said Sept 2018 including reference to Scientific Journal info.
HERE is a post that includes a video demonstration of the shear force side loading
Here is what I said Nov 2013
Or you can read pages from the book on tire design that came out of the Ford Explorer Recall.



My intention is to offer advice to get you better tire life. If the RV was designed such that the tire has to provide shock absorption rather than having a better suspension esign then shorter tire life is one of the trade offs you will need to live with.
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Old 11-06-2019, 03:37 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
There is a good reason to increase inflation above the minimum needed to support the measured load and that is to try and lower the Interply Shear forces.

If you want to know why this is suggested then you may need to understand a little about the Science behind tire failures by learning about this force that is always trying to give you a belt separation.


Here is what Goodyear says in March 2019

Here is what I said Sept 2018 including reference to Scientific Journal info.
HERE is a post that includes a video demonstration of the shear force side loading
Here is what I said Nov 2013
Or you can read pages from the book on tire design that came out of the Ford Explorer Recall.



My intention is to offer advice to get you better tire life. If the RV was designed such that the tire has to provide shock absorption rather than having a better suspension esign then shorter tire life is one of the trade offs you will need to live with.



The video was worth a 1000 words. Very obvious what is going on.

And very interesting.


Ok, I am not sure what you are recommending in regards tire pressure?


Maximum? Or to use some intelligence in coming up with a proper value for daily driving tire pressure?


Thanks
Bill
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Old 11-06-2019, 10:56 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by ArmyVeteran View Post
The video was worth a 1000 words. Very obvious what is going on.
And very interesting.
Ok, I am not sure what you are recommending in regards tire pressure?
Maximum? Or to use some intelligence in coming up with a proper value for daily driving tire pressure?
Thanks
Bill

Glad you found the info informative. In my blog I have covered recommended inflation a number of time in detail.


Short answer for trailers that have not changed tire size or Load Range is to run the pressure on the tire sidewall. Most of the time this is the inflation on your RV Certification label i.e. the pressure recommended by the RV MFG.

If you have increased size and or increased the Load Range then run the pressure that was on your OE tires.


It is always a good idea to learn your actual tire loading with scale readings on each tire position. Ya this isn't easy as you have to find a local company (building supply or gravel pit) with a scale and follow THIS instruction. Use the tables to ensure you always run enough pressure to support 115% (125% is better) of the measured heavies loaded tire.


Read some of my blog posts in the evening to learn more.





Motorhomes get a different answer
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