291RESL Heating vs. Winterizing - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 10-31-2019, 08:20 PM   #1
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291RESL Heating vs. Winterizing

Back in Action again after a season off for military caused back injuries... Now I am interested in finding out if there is a way to add electric heat the underside of my 2015 model 291RESL Kodiac so I don't have the issues I had last year... according to the people who worked on my TT (dealership) the weatherization from 2017/2018 did not stop a freeze of a valve in the exterior connections and was not covered by warranty. I DO NOT TRUST THE DEALERSHIPS ANYMORE!!!!
So I ask:
1. As I keep my TT plugged in here in Oklahoma to AC is there a way to use an electric heater to keep the unit ready to travel at a moments notice? I use the TT as an Amateur Radio Emergency Command post and as a guest house for company over the holidays...
2. If item 1 is not a reality... Is there a procedural checklist and/or Instruction manual to winterize my RESL?
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Old 10-31-2019, 08:29 PM   #2
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Old 10-31-2019, 08:30 PM   #3
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I blow my lines out wit compressed air. I have a Voltage toyhauler.
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Old 11-06-2019, 10:26 PM   #4
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Adding heat during storage could lead to condensation and all the problems associated with that.
If you have a sealed underbelly you might be able to "T" off of a furnace duct and enter a duct into the underbelly.
They make heat strip pads that stick to your holding tanks.
For your situation storing your rig in a temp controlled shop or garage would be ideal or winterize by blowing all your lines out with air. Draining all tanks and low level water lines. To hit the road fast all you have to do is add water.
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Old 11-07-2019, 01:18 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1l243 View Post
Adding heat during storage could lead to condensation and all the problems associated with that.
If you have a sealed underbelly you might be able to "T" off of a furnace duct and enter a duct into the underbelly.
They make heat strip pads that stick to your holding tanks.
For your situation storing your rig in a temp controlled shop or garage would be ideal or winterize by blowing all your lines out with air. Draining all tanks and low level water lines. To hit the road fast all you have to do is add water.
Thank you for the information - This is a sealed "arctic" underbelly and is supposed to be capable of use in sub-zero weather. As Inside storage is an impossibility right now I asked a tech I know for his suggestions... basically he suggested the same as you with the exception of also purchasing a larger propane tank and keeping the furnace running with the heat at 50 degrees and not use an electric heater.
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Old 11-07-2019, 03:48 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Red Badger View Post
Thank you for the information - This is a sealed "arctic" underbelly and is supposed to be capable of use in sub-zero weather. As Inside storage is an impossibility right now I asked a tech I know for his suggestions... basically he suggested the same as you with the exception of also purchasing a larger propane tank and keeping the furnace running with the heat at 50 degrees and not use an electric heater.
Don't let that ARCTIC sealed underbelly fool you. It isn't worth anything for temps below freezing. You should make sure ALL the water is out of your system or mixed with anti freeze. This includes the tanks. Keeping the heater on at 50 degrees is not right either. It doesn't do much for the lines that stick down below the underbelly or in the walls of the RV like your spray port or system drains.

The ONLY way to keep lines from freezing are blowing them out or winterizing with a good antifreeze.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:29 PM   #7
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Frank's post above is correct. I have a Kodiak Cub. It was advertised with an enclosed and heated underbelly. It was also advertised as an "All Season" TT.

I bought it in Dec of 1017. I tested it in my driveway. The kitchen water line froze within 4 hours when the temperature dropped from 34 degrees to 29 degrees.

The user manual for my TT (and apparently for many others) said winterize the plumbing for temperatures below 32 deg F. Apparently all season does not include working plumbing.

To use the plumbing required sealing and insulating the plumbing under the floor. The dealer paid about $2000, Kodiak paid $200, and I provide about $1000 worth of additional labor and materials.

Kodiak paid $200 because the "Heated underbelly" had a furnace hose going to the floor, but was not cut through to the under belly.

The dealer sealed the frame to the floor and the belly cover to the frame. He added insulation all around underneath and electric heating pads to the three water tanks.

I upgraded the furnace heat to the underbelly, and insulated the bare steel wheel wells where water pipes rested on the steel or ran very close. I also arranged for return air to the furnace to pass through closed plumbing spaces under cabinets. The water heater and it's pipes were exposed in the front pass through and was not closed into the inside cabinet plumbing spaces. I enclosed and insulated that space.

After all that, I still cannot dump waste water in freezing weather because the exposed dump valves freeze.

Good luck with your modifications.
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Old 11-07-2019, 10:25 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Badger View Post
Thank you for the information - This is a sealed "arctic" underbelly and is supposed to be capable of use in sub-zero weather. As Inside storage is an impossibility right now I asked a tech I know for his suggestions... basically he suggested the same as you with the exception of also purchasing a larger propane tank and keeping the furnace running with the heat at 50 degrees and not use an electric heater.
I would rule out running the furnace when in storage.
Your best bet is to drain tanks including the water heater and low level water lines. Blow out water lines at 50psi (they sell an adapter) to connect to your city water inlet. Make sure you include the black tank flush line.
Do not add anti freeze.
There should be no water left to freeze.
When you have to bugout just fill the fresh water tank.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:56 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by 1l243 View Post
I would rule out running the furnace when in storage.
Your best bet is to drain tanks including the water heater and low level water lines. Blow out water lines at 50psi (they sell an adapter) to connect to your city water inlet. Make sure you include the black tank flush line.
Do not add anti freeze.
There should be no water left to freeze.
When you have to bugout just fill the fresh water tank.
When he runs out of gas (and doesn't know it) the lines will freeze.. when it gets below 32 for several hours when running the furnace, the lines will freeze, if he doesn't flush the lines, the lines will freeze... leaving water in the hot water tank, will end up smelling like rotten eggs probably... letting water set in the fresh tank, not a good idea.

let us know which you decide to do.

frank
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