Wind Turbine vs. Solar Panels - Page 2 - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 03-04-2015, 01:10 AM   #21
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Yes, you can get auto and fancy. But we just plug the shore power cord into the inverter outlet. Be sure to shut your converter off if you go this route. I have the converter isolated on its own ac breaker which I keep flipped off.

If you want to run the microwave or hair dryer off of an inverter, you'll need 4+ batteries and likely a 2000+ watt pure sine wave inverter. Then a way to recharge all those batteries relatively quickly. Large draw items just don't lend themselves well to bring run off a battery.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:51 AM   #22
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I was being a bit pessimistic, but you'll need two batteries minimum to run a microwave.
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Old 03-04-2015, 12:09 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewarnerusa View Post
I was being a bit pessimistic, but you'll need two batteries minimum to run a microwave.
I currently have 2-6 volts and planned to add 2 more if/when I do this. I am pretty sure this will happen, but probably not until it warms up a bit more. The idea of just plugging the power cord into the inverter is as simple as it gets...dare I say, ingenious? Well, EYE (for emphasis) never would have thought of doing that, but that was just the type of idea I was looking for. I am not clear on what I would have to do to isolate the converter or where the converter is even located, but hopefully that is also relatively easy to do. I think I can remember to make the switch once I get it all figured out. If anyone has a Voltage 3905 and can help me understand the location of, and how to isolate the converter, please share.
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Old 03-04-2015, 01:35 PM   #24
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My converter was originally wired into one of the other breakers, I think the GFI outlets. There was room in my panel to add another breaker, so that's what I did and I used it for the converter alone. So this breaker is my converter on/off switch. See the pic below for the original configuration. The breaker with two wires coming from it, one of which has an orange wire nut, was feeding 120V a.c. to the converter. I split the wiring at that wire nut and tied the orphaned wire to the new breaker.
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