110V space heaters - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 01-03-2013, 08:33 PM   #1
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110V space heaters

Can anyone tell me the best 110V space heater for the money. I not looking for something that will eat electricity..

We are full timers at this time, and want to supplement the heat.
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:39 PM   #2
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The beauty of electric heat is that it is 100% efficient. It doesn't matter what heater you get, they are all 100% efficient. So it really boils down to how fast you can circulate the air to feel warmer faster. No electric heater is faster or hotter than another of the same wattage.
I use a ceramic heater as it is compact and has a fan.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:39 PM   #3
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Thanks, good info,,
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Old 01-04-2013, 02:56 AM   #4
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As many will say, a 1500 watt heater is a 1500 watt heater regardless of how the 1500 watts is produced. Whether a 1500 watt bulb or a ceramic element or a coil, it's all the same drain on the system.

A heater with a small fan will be better than an oil filled radiator typr heater because the fan moves the air further and better than normal heat radiation.

I have both (radiator and fan driven), but prefer the heater with the fan and a timer circuit.
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Old 01-04-2013, 03:54 AM   #5
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As many will say, a 1500 watt heater is a 1500 watt heater regardless of how the 1500 watts is produced. Whether a 1500 watt bulb or a ceramic element or a coil, it's all the same drain on the system.

A heater with a small fan will be better than an oil filled radiator typr heater because the fan moves the air further and better than normal heat radiation.

I have both (radiator and fan driven), but prefer the heater with the fan and a timer circuit.
Thanks for the info
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:51 AM   #6
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I've noticed in our trailer that an electric heater on the 1500 watt setting will have a slow moving fan. Almost like the heating element is taking up all the available power and there isn't enough left over for the fan to run at full speed. On the 750 watt setting, the fan will run at full speed. I've read somewhere that RV wiring isn't up to the task of high electric draw items, so that is what I think is going on.
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Old 01-06-2013, 03:04 AM   #7
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One way to find out for sure if your thinking is correct would be to simply try the heater on the 1500 watt setting in a residence.
I'm inclined to believe the RV wiring will handle a 1500 heater. Your service may be 30 amp or 50 amp, even a 20 amp service will handle a 1500 watt draw. That's only about 12 amps of comsumption. About the same as your toaster, small microwave or hair dryer.
I would be more inclined to believe that the fan speed is purposely slower on the maximum wattage for any number of engineering thoughts. One of which the high wattage and slower fan speed is to keep the amperage below the 15 amp threshold that usually services common outlets.
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Old 01-06-2013, 03:26 AM   #8
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The fan has always worked at the same speed on both settings in the home. I brought it out to the TT for winter tinkering and noticed the slowed fan when on high. I'll have to bring it back in and try it out.
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:41 PM   #9
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The fan has always worked at the same speed on both settings in the home. I brought it out to the TT for winter tinkering and noticed the slowed fan when on high. I'll have to bring it back in and try it out.
Was anything else running while you tinkered???
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Old 01-06-2013, 02:49 PM   #10
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Was anything else running while you tinkered???
Nope. Not even the converter/charger. TT is plugged into a standard home outlet (20A?) I'll report what happens when I bring it back in and try it in the house.

Now that I think about it, the "claim" I read about RV wiring not being beefy enough doesn't make much sense because we've got A/C units and microwaves in them. They have a big draw. I'll try different outlets within the TT, too.
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:38 PM   #11
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We use a small ceramic heater made by Honeywell. It is about 6" square, it is enough to take the chill out at night,and will heat the trailer no problem during the day. I also set the furnace to come on at just a slightly lower Temp. in case it gets really cold at night, or if the power were to go out.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:06 PM   #12
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Nope. Not even the converter/charger. TT is plugged into a standard home outlet (20A?) I'll report what happens when I bring it back in and try it in the house.

Now that I think about it, the "claim" I read about RV wiring not being beefy enough doesn't make much sense because we've got A/C units and microwaves in them. They have a big draw. I'll try different outlets within the TT, too.
The standard home outlet is normally 15 amps. Unless it is a special or dedicated drop for a portable spa or something like that. If it is 20 amp the plug configuration would be different that a 15 amp plug.

Assuming it's a normal 15 amp outlet and you have the heater on 1500 watts you are probably working the circuit to the max. Couple that with running the TT off the shore cord that not only adds length it adds voltage drop and resistance.

With that said, if the heater works normal in the house then it's apparently ok. That sot of eleminates the TT wiring which you have decided is capable of handling the loads you mentioned.

That leaves the shore cord and the standard outlet. Those cords are large and designed to carry large loads but that's not free. The cord needs the amperage to be available to power the loads it was designed to handle. So now we have the standard outlet. That probably is the culprit if everything else is good. The 15 amps isn't enough to service the heater at 1500 watts with the fan on high speed using the residential outlet.

You haven't said if the heater has tripped the breaker with the way you had/have it connected. I would think given enough time the breaker would trip because of the components involved.

Do you know what the electrical service for the TT is rated for? 20,30,50 amps?

The ultimate test would be to drag the TT to an RV park pedestal and connect the TT to it and test the heater. I bet you'll find it works as it should.
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:33 PM   #13
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TT is 30 amp service. No additional extension cords and the 30 amp to 15 amp adapter is the standard dog bone. I have not ever had it trip a breaker. Threw it on a kill a watt and the heater pulls around 600 Watts on low and 1200 Watts on high.
I played bit with things and I think it is just a matter of the components in the heater getting fully warmed up. Once that happened, the fan sound barely changed pitch between high and low power.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:29 PM   #14
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FYI, a standard home outlet is 15 amps not 20. The size of the wire and the length of run to the outlet you've plugged your trailer into could reduce the available amperage if it is too light or too far from the panel.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:36 PM   #15
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Got my heater delivered this weekend. Temperatures in the 60's here today, but I am not complaining. It will be needed later this week.

It is perfect for my little TT - it can fit on the floor or the counter. I like that it oscillates so no area will get too hot.

It is 400 watt or 800 watt & Is supposed to be as efficient as a 1500 watt unit. It is very quiet. Great for "just in case" the propane runs out, but likely using it will cut down on the need for the built in propane heater.

Soleus Air HR3-08-21, Oscillating Reflective Heater
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:07 AM   #16
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We keep two electric heaters on at all times (when camping or parked): a larger, oscilating unit in the main area and a small ceramic in the bedroom. We cannot use anything else with the two plugged in or a breaker will throw, so I carry a cord with the end cut off I can slip in from the bottom of the slid. I'm using wire nuts to reconnect it. This way the large unit is running off the pole outlet when we're camping. Saving propane!! We run the ac fan on low to keep it from sweating.
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