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Old 01-30-2016, 01:37 PM   #1
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Golf Cart Batteries question

I have a Voltage 3970 toy hauler. The battery installed is a deep cycle Interstate. I have been reading posts that point to using the 2 6volt batteries for longer usage time. My question, is there enough amp in the 6volt battery system to still start the generator?
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Old 01-30-2016, 02:18 PM   #2
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I have a Voltage 3970 toy hauler. The battery installed is a deep cycle Interstate. I have been reading posts that point to using the 2 6volt batteries for longer usage time. My question, is there enough amp in the 6volt battery system to still start the generator?
With the 6 volters wired correctly you will have more amperage available than you have now with the so called deep cycle battery from the manufacturer.
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Old 01-30-2016, 03:34 PM   #3
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When shopping for Deep Cycle batteries, look for reserve capacity. If you see Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) that will indicate a Marine Starting/Deep Cycle battery.

Check this link, it will show you how to wire 2 - 6V batteries to put out 12V.

Series And Parallel | How To Wire What you Want Easily And Effectively
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Old 01-30-2016, 05:15 PM   #4
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When shopping for real, true deep cycle batteries stay away from any of them that have MCCA or CCA ratings. Those are heavy starting batteries but they aren't true deep cycle batteries.
You aren't looking for reserve capacity, you are looking for amperage delivered over a given period of time.
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Old 01-30-2016, 05:29 PM   #5
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Ok, any of the batteries that are 12volt, look for the MCCA or CCA ratings and stay away from them. The 12volt deep cycle battery would be comparable to the 2 6volt batteries? Price would be better with one battery instead of 2. Thanks for the information.
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Old 01-30-2016, 05:43 PM   #6
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When shopping for real, true deep cycle batteries stay away from any of them that have MCCA or CCA ratings. Those are heavy starting batteries but they aren't true deep cycle batteries.
You aren't looking for reserve capacity, you are looking for amperage delivered over a given period of time.
Sundancer,

I think we're saying the same thing, in Canada "reserve capacity" means amp/hours.

Not sure how your batteries are labelled in the US, I was in town yesterday looking at a new suppliers product.

Thier Marine/Deep Cycle batteries show the CCA and Reserve Capacity as Amp/ Hours.
Thier true Deep Cycle don't have any CCA shown and Reserve Capacity shows Amp/Hours.

I guess it's a matter of semantics, but it's how our batteries are labelled. It is getting harder to find true deep cycle batteries any place but a battery store. All the big box stores and most of the auto parts stores to have gone to the combination batteries.
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Old 01-30-2016, 05:48 PM   #7
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Ok, any of the batteries that are 12volt, look for the MCCA or CCA ratings and stay away from them. The 12volt deep cycle battery would be comparable to the 2 6volt batteries? Price would be better with one battery instead of 2. Thanks for the information.
No the two 6V batteries will give more amp/hours than the 12V, that's why we convert to the 6V.

It may not be an issue if your not doing a lot of off grid camping.
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Old 01-30-2016, 07:48 PM   #8
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Sundancer,

I think we're saying the same thing, in Canada "reserve capacity" means amp/hours.

Not sure how your batteries are labelled in the US, I was in town yesterday looking at a new suppliers product.

Thier Marine/Deep Cycle batteries show the CCA and Reserve Capacity as Amp/ Hours.
Thier true Deep Cycle don't have any CCA shown and Reserve Capacity shows Amp/Hours.

I guess it's a matter of semantics, but it's how our batteries are labelled. It is getting harder to find true deep cycle batteries any place but a battery store. All the big box stores and most of the auto parts stores to have gone to the combination batteries.
Over the years of living off the grid I had to go to battery stores to get true deep cycles. The big box places will put any label on anything to make a sale.
I did find some Trojans at a Batteries Plus store once. Six batteries with a lifetime of 5 years is better than no electricity at all.


Here's a better reserve/amphour understanding,,,,,,,,,,,
Reserve capacity is the number of minutes a battery can maintain a useful voltage under a 25 ampere discharge. The higher the minute rating, the greater the battery's ability to run lights, pumps, inverters, and electronics for a longer period before recharging is necessary. The 25 Amp. Reserve Capacity Rating is more realistic than Amp-Hour or CCA as a measurement of capacity for deep cycle service. Batteries promoted on their high Cold Cranking Ratings are easy and inexpensive to build. The market is flooded with them, however their Reserve Capacity, Cycle Life (the number of discharges and charges the battery can deliver) and Service life are poor. Reserve Capacity is difficult and costly to engineer into a battery and requires higher quality cell materials.

For instance, Rolls, Surrette and Lifeline use thicker lead grids (the plate's skeletal structure) to support additional positive plate oxides which are compressed into a denser form in order to add battery reactive material for greater Reserve Capacity and Cycling Performance. In addition, these plates are separated by indestructible separators. These mats hold the active oxides tightly in place during the cubical plate expansion which occurs during deep discharging, instead of allowing the oxides to shed off and precipitate to the bottom of the battery. Construction materials such as those raise the Reserve Capacity of a battery and increase the battery's Cycle Life.
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Old 01-31-2016, 02:40 PM   #9
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I have been looking around at the various batteries and the space that I have with my current battery boxes. I don't do a lot of serious dry camping. I am leaning more towards getting the deep cycle battery for now. I have definitely learned more about the differences between batteries and what to look for.
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Old 01-31-2016, 04:24 PM   #10
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If your not going to be off the grid more than your on it, then I wouldn't worry about converting to the 2-6V batteries.

A 12V Group 27 true deep cyle battery should fit your needs.

If boondocking is something that you will be doing occasionally during the warmer weather, consider a potable solar panel to keep the battery topped up. This worked well for us when we were doing weekends at the lake.
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