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Old 06-03-2019, 11:32 PM   #1
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12v 6000 watt Inverter

I am looking for a 12 volt 6000 watt inverter. It needs to output at least 50 amps and have a AC IN and AC OUT connection. Pure sine preferably. We need to run one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. We have solar and enough battery to handle it. Just not the inverter. Thanks.
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Old 06-04-2019, 12:54 AM   #2
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I am looking for a 12 volt 6000 watt inverter. It needs to output at least 50 amps and have a AC IN and AC OUT connection. Pure sine preferably. We need to run one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. We have solar and enough battery to handle it. Just not the inverter. Thanks.

12 volt/6k watt may be hard to find. Producing that many watts needs 24 or 48 volts.
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Old 06-04-2019, 12:13 PM   #3
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Try aims power. Aimscorp.net
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Old 06-04-2019, 02:25 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by campincaptain View Post
I am looking for a 12 volt 6000 watt inverter. It needs to output at least 50 amps and have a AC IN and AC OUT connection. Pure sine preferably. We need to run one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. We have solar and enough battery to handle it. Just not the inverter. Thanks.
That is 500 amps at 12 volts. Running it for 6 hours 3000 amp hours. That will be a substantial weight and volume in lead acid batteries.

Are you planning to use this in an RV?
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Old 06-04-2019, 03:01 PM   #5
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Is this even a doable request? Surely not in 12 volt.
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Old 06-04-2019, 03:51 PM   #6
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Biggest one I could find @12volts was 2K.

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Old 06-05-2019, 11:33 PM   #7
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Canadian Tire has a 300W with a 6000W surge on sale for $180.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:20 PM   #8
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Transfer Switch w/inverter?

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Originally Posted by campincaptain View Post
I am looking for a 12 volt 6000 watt inverter. It needs to output at least 50 amps and have a AC IN and AC OUT connection. Pure sine preferably. We need to run one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. We have solar and enough battery to handle it. Just not the inverter. Thanks.
6000 watts is about 50 amps at 120 volts. That would be 50 amps output for an inverter. An inverter would have DC as an input of about 10 times that amount or 500 amps. An inverter would not have an AC input.

However, a transfer switch would have both a 50 amp input and output. Are you sure you do not want a transfer switch? Perhaps a transfer switch with a built in inverter?

The switch would switch to shore power if available and switch to the battery powered inverter when shore power is not available. The transfer switch might even have an additional input to connect a generator.


You should be able to run a microwave and air conditioner with 30 amp at 120 volts. This would be 3600 watts.


So you need an 3600 watt inverter and a transfer switch. What is the size of your shore power system? It is usually 30amp 120 volts or 50 amp 230 volts.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:30 PM   #9
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An inverter would not have an AC input.

Might want to check that statement professor.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:45 PM   #10
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An inverter would not have an AC input.

Might want to check that statement professor.
Listen and learn cricket.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:55 PM   #11
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What I did learn was that when I started my generator, that was connected to my 2400 watt inverter, I heard a click of the transfer switch and watched my battery voltage rise as they were being charged.


Of course it could have been a 20 year glitch in my solar house, dunno. I'm sure the generator was producing 110volts AC but I could be wrong.
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Old 06-12-2019, 10:09 PM   #12
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not a good idea to have a 6000W inverter at 12V

At 12V, you need at least 550A to supply a 6000W inverter, due to inverter inefficiency. The ampacity of 4/0 wire is 250-300A maximum, depending on where the cable is run (in a chase, free air, or whatever). So you need even bigger wires than 4/0. 4/0 wires are very difficult to route and use. Basically, this means that probably no one builds a 6000W inverter at 12V.

But you don't really need 6000W. A 13.5KBTU air only needs about 1800W to run. It probably needs >3000W to start, but only 1800W to run. Your microwave only needs about 1100W to run. So technically, you could probably get away with a 3000W inverter. Just start the A/C before you start the microwave.

Your real problem is your A/C and microwave are probably on different phases of a split phase system in a 50A coach.

Therefore you need a 3000W split phase inverter or two 2500W inverters that can sync with each other. Typically a good 2500W inverter has enough surge capability to start a 13.5KBTU A/C.

AIMS Power has an inverter to do this. All AIMS inverters are built by Sigineer in China, who also sells direct to the USA.

Currently my favorite inverter is the Victron, followed by the Outback and then the Magnum. I've had and used many Magnum's over the years and love them, but Magnum quit innovating several years ago when they were bought out and so have fallen behind in the technology.

Good luck with your project!
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:02 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by sundancer 87 View Post
What I did learn was that when I started my generator, that was connected to my 2400 watt inverter, I heard a click of the transfer switch and watched my battery voltage rise as they were being charged.

Of course it could have been a 20 year glitch in my solar house, dunno. I'm sure the generator was producing 110volts AC but I could be wrong.
Sundancer,

What you have is a transfer switch and a converter/charger. The transfer switch clicks when the switch connects one of its AC inputs to the generator AC output. The converter charger 115 v input connects to the transfer switch AC output. The converter charger 12 v output connects to the battery bank.
For RV and TT:
An inverter has a DC input and an AC output. That is usually 12 DC volts in and 115 AC out.
A converter/charger has one 115 volt AC in and one 12 volt DC out.
A Transfer switch has one AC output and 2 or more AC inputs all 120 volts. Only one input is connected to the output at a time. It may also have other switches depending on other functions being combined in the same box. For example, the converter charger may be switched off when the inverter is switched on.
A 50 amp 230 volt AC transfer switch may have two transfer switches. One for L1 and one for L2. L2ís output may switch to connect to L1ís out when L2ís volts are not available.
There are lots of combinations of functions in RVís. Most but not all TTís are much simpler.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:06 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by campincaptain View Post
I am looking for a 12 volt 6000 watt inverter. It needs to output at least 50 amps and have a AC IN and AC OUT connection. Pure sine preferably. We need to run one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. We have solar and enough battery to handle it. Just not the inverter. Thanks.
Another possibility is campincaptain wants a 50 amp converter/charger, not an inverter. It would have 115 volt AC input and 12 volt 50 amp DC output. These are widely available. See WFCO.com.


Of course it would be inconsistent with running a microwave and air conditioner.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:32 PM   #15
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Paul, you are assuming I'm speaking of an RV.. As I said earlier I lived in a solar powered house for 20 years. A house I built with my own two hands with local materials. I had 12 panels, 6 6volt deep cycles and a Honda motorhome generator for backup. I also had a wind generator. The AC and DC circuits were protected with the proper circuit breakers in their own load centers.



All this I installed and maintained myself. As mentioned before I do know the difference between a converter/charger and an inverter/charger with AC input. My last inverter was the Xantrex 2400.



Stop and read the posts in the thread before you try and dazzle us with details and baffle us with bull****.
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Old 06-12-2019, 11:58 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by sundancer 87 View Post
Paul, you are assuming I'm speaking of an RV.. As I said earlier I lived in a solar powered house for 20 years. A house I built with my own two hands with local materials. I had 12 panels, 6 6volt deep cycles and a Honda motorhome generator for backup. I also had a wind generator. The AC and DC circuits were protected with the proper circuit breakers in their own load centers.



All this I installed and maintained myself. As mentioned before I do know the difference between a converter/charger and an inverter/charger with AC input. My last inverter was the Xantrex 2400.



Stop and read the posts in the thread before you try and dazzle us with details and baffle us with bull****.
So you are charging your batteries with your inverter?
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:18 AM   #17
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Not now as I left that house a few years ago and came back to the US. I did charge the batteries with the inverter when I fired up the generator. There were days without sun, not many but some. There wasn't city electricity where I lived so it was solar, wind and generator.
I am now charging the RV's batteries with the converter as the RV is connected to my full hook up RV space, in my yard.
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:38 AM   #18
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That is 500 amps at 12 volts. Running it for 6 hours 3000 amp hours. That will be a substantial weight and volume in lead acid batteries.

Are you planning to use this in an RV?
Yes, we have 4 6v 420ah Interstate batteries, series parallel wiring for 12v. I probably will not find one so we are going to go to 24v and use a 24v to 12v converter for the rv 12v and the 24v battery bank for inverter i think
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:59 AM   #19
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6000 watts is about 50 amps at 120 volts. That would be 50 amps output for an inverter. An inverter would have DC as an input of about 10 times that amount or 500 amps. An inverter would not have an AC input.

However, a transfer switch would have both a 50 amp input and output. Are you sure you do not want a transfer switch? Perhaps a transfer switch with a built in inverter?

The switch would switch to shore power if available and switch to the battery powered inverter when shore power is not available. The transfer switch might even have an additional input to connect a generator.


You should be able to run a microwave and air conditioner with 30 amp at 120 volts. This would be 3600 watts.


So you need an 3600 watt inverter and a transfer switch. What is the size of your shore power system? It is usually 30amp 120 volts or 50 amp 230 volts.
So here is the setup. 2017 Voltage 3970 toy hauler

Orginal setup we tried was an Aims Power 4000 Watt Pure Sine Inverter Charger 12Vdc / 240Vac Input & 120/240Vac Split Phase Output

The problem with this one was that the AC uses 16 amps at surge and constant 12 amps AC, the microwave uses 12 amps. The Interter is 33.3 amps AC output but could not handle the AC and micro at the same time. When connecting shore power with the 50 amp service the inverter would shut off along with ac power in the rv. That was because the Interter only allowed 33 amps output. We originally had it wired between the transfer switch and the breaker panel per AIMS Powers tech support. But no matter what we did it would only put out 30 amps. What was confusing was the inverter was set up for 2 wire even though it was a 120/240 split phase. It would accept one hot, one neutral and a ground for both AC input and AC output. The Voltage is wired with 4 wire, two hot legs and a neutral. 50 amp split breaker in the panel with red on one side and black wire on the other. So only one side of the breaker panel would work. So we combined the red and black going into the inverter and separated it going out to the panel. But still only 30 amps not the 50 we needed.

2nd Setup
We now are using a Aims Power 6000 Watt Pure Sine Inverter Charger 24Vdc / 240Vac Input & 120/240Vac Split Phase Output

The battery bank was converted to 24v and we used a 24v to 12v converter to connect all the 12v services on the 5th wheel to. 24v is only going to the inverter. Again the wiring was confusing as see in the wiring pic attached.

When we connected the 24v inverter as shown in the wiring diagram everything worked just fine when connected to shore power and running on inverter only. We can run 2 AC units or one AC unit and the microwave at the same time. When shore power is connected the inverter switches over to charger mode and charges the battery bank.

Now, for the issue we are currently facing. When we disconnect shore power and start the gen (Onan Cummins 5500 RVQ) the gen will take over powering the 5th wheel but the inverter will not reconize the AC power coming into the inverter. The inverter will not change over to charger mode. I am not an electrician and I do not understand the higher voltage when it comes to connecting 240 split phase. All I know is that everything works as it should when connected to shore power or running off the inverter (battery bank) just not the gen. Everything is going through the same transfer switch then inverter to the panel. When the gen is on the voltage coming out of the inverter is jumping all over the place from 85v to 135v but a steady 118-120v when going to and out of the transfer switch. Below are the links to the inverters we have tried and are using now (24v).

https://www.aimscorp.net/6000-Watt-P...r-24-Volt.html

https://www.aimscorp.net/4000-Watt-1...r-120-240.html

https://www.sigineer.com/product-cat...rter-chargers/
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:00 AM   #20
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Possible cause:
US 230 volt 50 amp has 4 wires. They are L1, L2, Neutral, and Ground. According to the Aims installation instructions, the neutral shore power input wire is not connected in split phase models. It is left unconnected.


If you plug the shore power cord into the generator, the generator neutral may not be connected to the Aims. A volt meter may show spurious voltages in systems with an open wire. I did not see instructions for wiring this case. The generator neutral must be connected to the generator/(shore power cord) ground to work with the Aims.


If you have a transfer switch as shown in the Aims Manual, the transfer switch should connect generator neutral to ground causing the Aims to work properly. Some transfer switches can be configured to either ground or not ground the neutral when a generator is connected.
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