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Old 08-28-2015, 11:21 PM   #1
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Wild animal alert

The real "dawniewest" fixing to wrastle a wild deer. This thing was eating bananas like a champion.
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Old 08-29-2015, 04:17 AM   #2
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How cool is that!!
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Old 08-29-2015, 01:22 PM   #3
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We had to put a high voltage electric fence around the grape arbors this year to keep them out. We even planted a diversion garden down on the tree line, the cropped that clean and headed for our gardens

I would love to see the herd of 15 or so cut down quite a bit. We live on 40 acres backed up to more land that is owned by the government. Subdivsions on the other sides of us, which is probably why they come here.

Saw this the other day...

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I had this idea that I could rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it. The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up-- 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation. I took a step towards it, it took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and then received an education.

The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope. That deer EXPLODED.

The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity. A deer-- no Chance. That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals. A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded
by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope. I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere.

At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual. Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder

- a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised I reached up there to grab that rope and when the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and slide off to then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head--almost like a pit bull. Tlley bite HARD and it hurts. The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds. I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose.

That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day. Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp... I learned a long time ago that, when an animal -like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape. This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run.

The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down. Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head. I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away. So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope......to sort of even the odds!! All these events are true so help me God...

An Educated Farmer


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Old 08-29-2015, 04:01 PM   #4
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I'm glad it didn't bite her, she's petrified of most animals, including dogs. I still can't believe she got that close to it.
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Old 08-30-2015, 05:50 AM   #5
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Best laugh I've had all day! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 09-01-2015, 01:08 AM   #6
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I totally get that deer are either revered or hated depending of where you live
I've stalked and killed many deer with a bow, but this is my proudest moment. I still totally respect harvesting for populating control.

This was a totally different high.
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Old 09-01-2015, 10:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dawniewest View Post
I totally get that deer are either revered or hated depending of where you live
I've stalked and killed many deer with a bow, but this is my proudest moment. I still totally respect harvesting for populating control.

This was a totally different high.
I completely agree. Our issue stems from loss of habitat. There used to be an 1100 acre tree farm on the other side of the road from us. It is now a 700+ home golf course community. If I recall the stats correctly NC is losing an average of 10 acres a day of farm or forest land to "progress". When they started clearing that 1100 acres all the critters came across the road to our place. We were overrun with red and gray fox which wreaked havoc on the chickens. Had a fellow come in and live trap, took 10 in less than a week. The subdivisions are also feeding a coyote problem. Big poultry operation on the other side of the golf course had $50,000 worth of damage done by them. I am just trying to figure out where all of these people are coming from! Wildlife I can deal with, can't eliminate suburbanites as pests.

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Old 07-25-2016, 12:22 PM   #8
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Thanks for sharing this
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:30 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by RodneyE View Post
Thanks for sharing this
You're welcome. I was going to say welcome to the site, but that's a lot of welcomes in two sentences.
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Old 07-25-2016, 06:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
I completely agree. Our issue stems from loss of habitat. There used to be an 1100 acre tree farm on the other side of the road from us. It is now a 700+ home golf course community. If I recall the stats correctly NC is losing an average of 10 acres a day of farm or forest land to "progress". When they started clearing that 1100 acres all the critters came across the road to our place. We were overrun with red and gray fox which wreaked havoc on the chickens. Had a fellow come in and live trap, took 10 in less than a week. The subdivisions are also feeding a coyote problem. Big poultry operation on the other side of the golf course had $50,000 worth of damage done by them. I am just trying to figure out where all of these people are coming from! Wildlife I can deal with, can't eliminate suburbanites as pests.

Aaron
Aaron,

Your deer roping story had me rolling on the floor, I saw the punch line coming before I got half way through the first sentence.

I think that farmer went to the wrong deer catching school, around these parts they make a corral out of hay bales. The deer find their way into the corral, the opening is closed off with a snow fence. It's like shooting fish in a barrel.

The biggest problem in our area is over population and the deer have no fear of people or dogs. I finally found a way to get them to leave my strawberry patch alone, seems they don't like cayenne pepper.

The people that get themselves into conficts with the deer are the city folks that think they are just cute little Bambi's and what can go wrong if we go over and pet it. What can go wrong is momma is watching and when you get too close, you will never out run momma. I'm not sure which is worse, a bear attack or a deer. I think I would sooner take my chances with a bear.
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Old 07-28-2016, 04:38 PM   #11
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It's official, the real Dawniewest is a Disney Princess.
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Old 07-28-2016, 04:43 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by GTWags View Post
It's official, the real Dawniewest is a Disney Princess.
She likes to think so.
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