5 seconds saved on quick connects - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 04-16-2013, 08:52 PM   #1
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5 seconds saved on quick connects

So far I enjoy my 3800, however, the more I add my personal touches and dig into the inner workings of this thing the more I find interesting time, and money, saving techniques used by Dutchman.

The quick connector in of itself is a quick way to attach wires together. I have used many of them over the years without problems and will continue to do so. But, I do and will take the time to separate the wires just to give me that added bit of insurance that sometime down the line I won't be creating an electrical problem that could blow fuses and potentially cause a fire.

It makes one wonder exactly how much money is saved by not taking the extra 5 seconds to separate the wires before using the quick connects. Apparently enough money is saved to buy a large liability policy and have a gaggle of lawyers on retainer.

This connection was found in the overhead light in the bedroom, the reading light as it were. Another instance of this was located at the propane sensor at the end of the counter. The twist nuts are a cheap way to connect wiring but installing the quick connectors in this fashion is pushing the envelope in my opinion.
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Old 04-17-2013, 12:00 AM   #2
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First time I have seen electrical quick connects used this way and not sure if it follows the electrical code in the USA or Canada...does any one know??...this is scary.
Thanks for sharing.

Coops
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Old 04-17-2013, 12:35 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Cooper View Post
First time I have seen electrical quick connects used this way and not sure if it follows the electrical code in the USA or Canada...does any one know??...this is scary.
Thanks for sharing.

Coops
Coops,

I don't believe that there is a 12 volt electrical code anywhere in the USA. It's just a right or wrong issue with whomever is putting the wires together. Although......there are electrical codes for stick built homes throughout each individual State.
I'm with you......this is scary.
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:30 AM   #4
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Infinityrver is correct. The NEC, National Electrical Code, is written for residential and commercial applications. Some states and cities have local codes but the NEC is the adopted rule that electricians work under.

The automotive trade doesn't have such a code so I suppose the automotive industry governs itself.

However, here's where it gets interesting. There are manufactured housing codes that parallel normal building codes. Now, the question is, do RVs fall under the NEC because we have 110 volt AC in the rigs or are they considered more to be manufactured housing? I'm sure RVs fall under some sort of regulation as to build and plumbing and electrical. I wouldn't bet on it though!!

I removed the quick connects from the wires pictured and saw that the installer didn't get into the insulation of the other wire. BUT, the first one I found had nicks and slight penetration into the other wire's insulation.

Lots of variables at work when the rig is rolling down the road. We don't need this trouble spot in our expensive rigs. As I mentioned earlier, 5 seconds to pull the wires apart wouldn't hurt the overall production of Dutchman's RVs.
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:49 AM   #5
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Looks like an in-line splice. Oh, yea, a quick connect. These things are used on two behind trailers and a bunch of other applications. I'll be checking my new rig to see how things were put together by Dutchmen. I'll be reporting back on what I find. Let's see, I'm growing a laundry list of things to check...
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Old 08-05-2013, 04:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundancer 87 View Post
So far I enjoy my 3800, however, the more I add my personal touches and dig into the inner workings of this thing the more I find interesting time, and money, saving techniques used by Dutchman.

The quick connector in of itself is a quick way to attach wires together. I have used many of them over the years without problems and will continue to do so. But, I do and will take the time to separate the wires just to give me that added bit of insurance that sometime down the line I won't be creating an electrical problem that could blow fuses and potentially cause a fire.

It makes one wonder exactly how much money is saved by not taking the extra 5 seconds to separate the wires before using the quick connects. Apparently enough money is saved to buy a large liability policy and have a gaggle of lawyers on retainer.

This connection was found in the overhead light in the bedroom, the reading light as it were. Another instance of this was located at the propane sensor at the end of the counter. The twist nuts are a cheap way to connect wiring but installing the quick connectors in this fashion is pushing the envelope in my opinion.
Those connectors are nothing but a "SHORT" cut to disaster waiting to happen. There is no excuse to be using them in manufacturing. They lay in the wiring harness before the walls get covered, so why do they need to due any splicing.

When I do any wiring I always try to run a wire back to a junction, which in the case of most of the RV lights that I have looked at have a terminal to run the next light the line off of.

I have seen more electrical failures as a result of using this connector in the wrong environment. They are prone to corrosion when used in areas where moisture can attack them.

On the very rare occasion where I could not get back to a junction or make proper line splice, I use liquid electrical tape to totally seal them. Then a wrap of electrical tape around the 2 wire side so that there is no strain put on the connector.

The more I read on this forum the more disappionted I am that I bought another Thor product.
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