Has anyone installed a backup camera on a Aerolite 242BHSL using the pre-wired mount? - Page 2 - Dutchmen Owners

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Old 11-13-2017, 01:52 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by powerdiver View Post
I installed this model on a Coleman 1605FB It works fine with the built in furrion mount but this model has only about a 100 ft range it worked fine on our setup I guess because the camper isnt very long, but Furrion make's a more expensive Observation camera that has about a 300 ft range.
Greetings All;
I’m new to this so I have a basic question - I have a Aerolite 292DBHS with a prewired camera mount. If the distance from wireless camera to the in cab receiver is less than 55 ft., wouldn’t a device with a 100 ft. range work fine? Am I missing something?
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Old 11-13-2017, 04:35 PM   #12
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Furrow camera

The back up only camera worked on our new camper 32ft long plus the crew cab F-250 truck worked while driving down the interstate it only lost signal a few times
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Old 11-14-2017, 12:09 PM   #13
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Thanks for the feedback.
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Old 11-14-2017, 10:51 PM   #14
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OK, I found a great wireless solution for rear cameras on the back of a travel trailer, with a digital encoded signal that rarely if ever drops out. Here it is:

Boyo VTX300D Vehicle Camera https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HJOSV3I?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf

Basically NOT a camera, and the lone picture is terrible, but the transmitter-receiver pair this kit is made up of work great for getting a clear composite video signal from the back of the trailer to the cab of the truck. No camera is included, but any composite video (yellow RCA plug) camera will work with the transmitter, and the receiver in the cab has the same composite video output to your radio or monitor.

A couple of things I should mention...

1. If you already have a backup camera on your truck, the best way to connect the Boyo receiver is to use a two to one composite video switch, so that you can switch between the rear bumper camera and the trailer rear camera, sharing the same monitor (rear view mirror or dashboard or radio). Once you have the trailer hooked up to the truck, your bumper camera is useless (except to see that the trailer is still attached, blocking the entire view), so you switch to the trailer camera.

2. You need to mount the receiver up above the pickup bed and all that metal. Mine is up on the left rear cab pillar, by the rear window. Great signal from the transmitter on the back of the trailer right through the trailer to the back of the cab.

The transmitter connects to a 12V or 24V power source (can be the reverse light on a vehicle but not to leave it powered up on the back of your trailer), and has two plugs out to the camera, one video and one providing power to the camera via some standard power plug. The camera I bought had the right power connector so it hooked right up, easy peasy.

The Boyo description on the Amazon website says it is waterproof... Well, kind of. The TRANSMITTER is in a waterproof silicone sleeve like a little scuba suit, but that will dry out and crack in the sun and heat, and once there are cracks it will leak. Only an idiot would leave it dangling in the sun, so plan on either cutting enough of a hole in the wall when locating a power wire, or mount it in some kind of plastic (not metal!) protection box. Look in the outlet and yard power area of your hardware store - there are a bunch of potential protective boxes and outlet covers you can use to protect the transmitter from the sun. I also suggest sealing any holes, seams or screws with clear silicone sealer (paint aisle).

The Boyo transmitter-receiver wireless solution above is independent of the camera you use, so long as you use a camera which has a composite video connection (yellow RCA plug). For my camera, I chose the Snanshi unit below:

SNANSHI Truck Lorry Pickup Bus Vehicle Caravans Backup Reversing Rear View Waterproof Camera with IR Cut LED Night Vision DC 9V - 35V Wide Voltage https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00YS80JNS?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf

It's an experiment, so far I'm liking it. Two minor issues.

First, the angle is adjustable, but even at its max upward position it is angled down at the bumper so that I can't see the road behind the trailer. This is fine for making sure you don't run over anything, but I needed to see any tree branches that might impact the trailer. I ended up attaching the camera mount to a cheap piece of galvanized metal plate from a hardware store framing aisle, which is then screwed to the trailer rear wall up high. I can easily bend the metal to achieve my desired angle.

T second issue is that the low light function, while automatic, requires the camera to switch to a black and white mode, which drops the video for 1-2 seconds. No big deal, except that around twilight it changes back and forth as the trailer moves or the light level changes, and it's off more than it's on. If you are trying to back up your trailer at the same time, it would be very inconvenient.

On the plus side, it has IR LEDs and is very bright at night, once it settles into low light mode. Also, the built-in sun shade is good for keeping the direct sunlight off the lens except for sunset and sunrise. And at under $30 it's a great deal.

So pick whatever camera you want (with the yellow RCA composite video plug), and you can use the Boyo transmitter-receiver pair to get a clear video stream from the back of your trailer to the cab of your truck. I definitely recommend this Boyo wireless solution for long rigs with 5th wheel or travel trailer.
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Old 11-16-2017, 05:45 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayL View Post
Greetings All;
I’m new to this so I have a basic question - I have a Aerolite 292DBHS with a prewired camera mount. If the distance from wireless camera to the in cab receiver is less than 55 ft., wouldn’t a device with a 100 ft. range work fine? Am I missing something?
So, the “pre-wired camera mount” has its uses, but they are limited. It provides a power connection, but no video pre-wire, so your video to the truck cab will need to be wireless. And the Furiron mount specifically mates up with Furrion backup cameras if you want it all to be perfect, neat and orderly… and expensive. Hundreds of dollars for reasonably adequate gear but nothing stellar. I decided to roll my own for both the camera ($26 or so on Amazon) and the digital wireless transmitter-receiver kit ($85 on Amazon). See my rather lengthy post in this same stream for details, but suffice to say it’s working very well.

As to whether a wireless camera or transmitter-receiver solution rated for 100 feet is good enough, if you mount the camera where the pre-wired mount is on the back of your trailer, you will be passing the wireless signal through the trailer and all the way up past the bed of the truck to the cab. It’s not as much the distance as the many absorbing and interfering surfaces and walls and wiring and metal objects in the way which might make something that can run 100 feet in a lab NOT work in the real world. The test lab had zero interference – or in many cases the numbers are mostly made up by marketing, or “interpolated” from figures published by the radio circuitry vendor… they don’t mean much until you test it on YOUR rig.

“Digital” wireless seems like an oxymoron, since electromagnetic waves are by definition analog/sinusoidal, and NOT digital, but what digital wireless means is that the video is a digitally encoded stream of bits OVER the analog radio signal. This allows for error correction protocols to attempt to recreate missing bits or to retransmit data too damaged to recreate if the analog radio signal encounters interference or whatever. It is not perfect – you can still get dropouts and pixelated video from time to time, but the extra “correction protocol” stuff will often give you better video streams in the same situation and signal levels or interference as compared to the same radio with only analog, which is what you’ll get unless there are specific mentions of digital transmission or the digital protocols used. Digital is more expensive, and generally provides some additional measure of goodness in the picture and video appearance; only you can decide if it’s enough better to justify the added expense.

Note that just because a camera or wireless system is expensive or relatively expensive does NOT mean that it’s digital, or that it’s any better than a $30 wireless camera… read reviews from several different sites for the same gear and don’t be taken in by a known name on the gear… vendors will charge all they can get, it’s capitalism at its finest (or worst). If any vendor is charging $300+ for a wireless camera solution that is NOT digital, they are gouging, period. So watch the specs and details, and read lots of reviews… Also, run any products you see on Amazon through https://www.fakespot.com – they check for “fake reviews” and provide a grade as to the percentage of the reviews that in their view (based on computer analytics and analysis of the wording and so forth) can be trusted or are probably bogus. And watch for bogus reviews on other forums and sites.

Good luck. Check out my other post for details on what I went with, or hit these links:
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HJOSV3I (Boyo digital transmitter-receiver kit)
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YS80JNS (Snanshi low-light IR backup camera)
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2017 Dutchmen Aerolite 242BHSL "Cabin in the woods"
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Old 11-16-2017, 06:14 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerdiver View Post
The back up only camera worked on our new camper 32ft long plus the crew cab F-250 truck worked while driving down the interstate it only lost signal a few times
Question - did you mean Furrion camera? I haven't seen "Furrow" out there (but it might exist). Furrion is a provider to trailer manufacturers, so I just wanted to be sure if it is a Furrion wireless camera that you are having good results from. I've seen mixed reviews, so I'm particularly interested in what an actual owner/user has to say. Thanks!
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2017 Dutchmen Aerolite 242BHSL "Cabin in the woods"
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Old 12-30-2017, 12:16 AM   #17
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Has anyone installed a backup camera on a Aerolite 242BHSL using the pre-wired mount?

I just bought a 2017 Coleman 202 RD with a pre-wired furrion mount. I took my furrion camera off a previous trailer and it won't work on the Coleman. the monitor has a jack for a second camera by the 12V plug and the camera works when I plug it in there. I have a feeling that it's not getting power at the back. I tried putting on the running lights and putting the TV in reverse (in case it's wired for backup only) but it doesn't work. Any suggestions?
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Old 01-02-2018, 08:48 PM   #18
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You might want to post this as a new question. It turns out that my Aerolite trailer doesn't have a pre-wired Furion mount, so I did everything from scratch. I've never seen a Furion mount and have no idea what to suggest. If you post this as a new question, people who have Furion mounts and cameras can reply to help you out with useful ideas.
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2017 Dutchmen Aerolite 242BHSL "Cabin in the woods"
2016 Ford F250 Superduty 6.2L Gas
55' Sea Ray "cabin on the beach" Coronado CA
Quote... "Give me ambivalence or give me something else."
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Old 01-02-2018, 11:26 PM   #19
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Thanks. Iím new to the forum and wasnít sure how to start a new thread. I have since figured it out.
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